Sunday, October 14, 2007

National Novel Writing Month

Okay, if you are cool, and only if your cool, then this challenge is for you - during the month of November, simply write a novel. A complete novel. That's all. 50,000 words, 1600 a day, nothing could be easier.

Unless you're some kind of wuss.

I'm doing it, some other people I know are doing it, and during the time that all us cool people are doing it together, we're gonna meet at fashionable and intellectual places like coffee shops and librarys to talk about the processes of creating literature and do other highbrow stuff like nibble biscotti and snicker at ignorant people. So unless you want to be snickered at, better join us. Cooooome-ooooon...... all the cool kids are doing it. It'll make you look older. I swear.

This year, I'll be writing my eleventh novel, a little story I plan to call 'Gameworld Talonshale'. It'll be the first in a series that takes the popular on-line games of today and turns them into gaming worlds in the distant future. The twist in every book, is that the gameplay, eventually, for different reasons, becomes real. That's right y'all. Kids pretending to be wizards suddenly have to protect themselves with their magicks. Kids pretending to be soldiers suddenly find themselves in the midst of blazing gun-battles. Kids pretending to be writers suddenly find themselves trying to finish an entire novel in a month - it's non-stop nuts.

Soooo, looking forward to it. Looking forward to seeing my nano friends again. Looking forward to reading my own completed eleventh novel, that's for sure. (If you notice: I'm talking about writing my eleventh novel, and in my last post, I talked about finishing my ninth novel. No, I'm not just colossally bad at math {yes I am}, I'm just racing to finish my tenth novel. 'Thundergate Tower'... yeah... two weeks left... I realize that... It's a short novel though... Hundred pages... Well into it... So leave me be... Gotta write.)


Friday, October 12, 2007

Spryton Wyldes - The Pinecone Wedge

Finished my ninth novel - the first draft anyway.
Here is a not-well-edited bit from the beginning
It does my old heart good to see so many of you have turned out to hear my tale. So many, by Erin, that perhaps it is too good to be true? Are we playing a little joke on poor Zvano? “Let us go and pretend to listen to the old storyteller, and then when he thinks he has caught us in the magick of his words, we will laugh at him and call him a fool.” No? Is this not the case? Have you truly come to hear the tale of Dobie and his band of misfit heroes? Of the ill-fated 'Pinecone Wedge', formed for the salvation of Spryton Wyldes, ready to do deeds that would ring down throughout history, but betrayed instead, by one of their own number?

Of course you have. Very well then.

Know that this is not a story that has ever been told by the bordermen of Cloverville.

Ah, you laugh. I see that Zvano is not the only one to sneak into the human village to listen to their tales. I find it a wonder that they know anything of the sprytes at all. I find it more so amazing when they actually get one of our tales right, as if they had been sneaking into our festivals and eavesdropping on our storytellers. Could you imagine? Borderman, hundreds of acorns tall, crouching down behind the stone grass to listen to Zvano’s little stories? Don’t look now, we wouldn’t want them to know we’d noticed them, would we?

No, gentle sprytes, if the storytellers from Cloverville were indeed spying on us, they would know that pyxies and bronnies are two kinds of sprytes. Again you laugh, but the borderman think that a pyxie and a spryte are roughly the same animal – its true. I’ve heard them argue this point on many occasions. They’ve never even heard of the other kingdoms; they’re likely to hear ‘grennies’ and ‘ruddies’ and ‘grellings’ and think that we are saying ‘greenies’, ‘reddys’, and ‘graylings’, as if we liked being named by our skin color.

Wednesday, October 03, 2007

Microfiction

It's hard to write, but a delight to read. Here is a sample of microfiction that I wrote for an assignment in my writing class. If you like the flavor, stories like this can be found all over the web. If you think you can write this sort of story, then I encourage you. There are lots of contests with admirable cash prizes, but I gotta warn you: It's harder that it at first appears (you have to have tension, character development, and a beginning, middle, and end, all in a ridiculously low word count).


The Crown of Glittering Plastic Gemstones (194 words)


Batman liked her but didn’t realize it. Nor did his two friends in the seat behind him, which was good. He would never be able to live down a crush on a second-grader.

The half-empty bus stopped in front of her trailer-house and she got on with a shy little smile.
Then she saw him and sat three seats away, across the aisle.

Batman moved behind her.

“Nice outfit, Princess. So what kingdom do you rule, ‘Stupid-topia’?”

The girl said nothing, but clutched her backpack and her lunchbox and her plastic scepter all tighter in her lap.

Batman’s friends, a pirate and a ninja, both laughed.

Batman grinned.

He swiped the plastic crown off her head and said, “Hey, lookit me, I’m ‘King Batman’, ‘King of Gotham’.”

The princess jumped up and turned around.

He tried to force the plastic tiara over the brow of his mask, and a third of it snapped off.
When she saw it break, her face cracked.

He let her snatch the two halves back. She dropped into her seat, sobbing.

“Oh well…” his voice was less confident, “I guess you can’t be a princess without a crown.”

His friends laughed.